Northern Plains Sustainable Ag Society

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If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you don't want to miss this farm tour! Hope you can make it.MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you dont want to miss this farm tour!  Hope you can make it.

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.

USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.

USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?

· We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA

· We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.

· We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!

The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!
... See MoreSee Less

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but  the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.  USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.  USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?  · We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA  · We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.  · We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!  The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.Due to market and supply/demand changes for meat products during the #COVID19 pandemic, the MDA is helping #livestock farmers and processors in addressing these current challenges.

More: www.mda.state.mn.us/mda-assists-livestock-producersprocessors-during-covid-19-pandemic #MNAg
... See MoreSee Less

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.

This is the only kind of dirty your hands should be!

We know microbial communities are influenced by management, but to what degree and how do the services they provide differ with management?

A study starting the Summer 2020 will focus on biological function in agricultural systems in North Dakota. In the past, NDSU has worked hard to build information on the chemical properties of soils (fertility, salts, organic matter), physical properties (aggregation, soil texture, water movement) and have been making headway on biological communities, but there's still questions about how soil microbial community function across multiple agricultural systems – a state-wide study. This is part of the Agribiome Research Initiative at NDSU and led by NDSU research faculty, Samiran (Sam) Banerjee.

More organic farms in the region are needed! NPSAS is working with NDSU to secure farmers for the study as we recognize this is a great opportunity for participating farmers to learn more about the soil health on their farm.

Specifics of your field will be kept confidential and you will receive information (e.g., soil health and microbial diversity) specific to your fields at the end of the study. If you are interested in participating, contact Sam (samiran.banerjee@ndsu.edu) or his Research Specialist, Kim Zitnick Anderson (kimberly.zitnick@ndsu.edu; cell: 240 298 2164).
... See MoreSee Less

This is the only kind of dirty your hands should be!  We know microbial communities are influenced by management, but to what degree and how do the services they provide differ with management?  A study starting the Summer 2020 will focus on biological function in agricultural systems in North Dakota. In the past, NDSU has worked hard to build information on the chemical properties of soils (fertility, salts, organic matter), physical properties (aggregation, soil texture, water movement) and have been making headway on biological communities, but theres still questions about how soil microbial community function across multiple agricultural systems – a state-wide study. This is part of the Agribiome Research Initiative at NDSU and led by NDSU research faculty, Samiran (Sam) Banerjee.  More organic farms in the region are needed! NPSAS is working with NDSU to secure farmers for the study as we recognize this is a great opportunity for participating farmers to learn more about the soil health on their farm.  Specifics of your field will be kept confidential and you will receive information (e.g., soil health and microbial diversity) specific to your fields at the end of the study. If you are interested in participating, contact Sam (samiran.banerjee@ndsu.edu) or his Research Specialist, Kim Zitnick Anderson (kimberly.zitnick@ndsu.edu; cell: 240 298 2164).
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Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you don't want to miss this farm tour! Hope you can make it.MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you dont want to miss this farm tour!  Hope you can make it.

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.

USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.

USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?

· We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA

· We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.

· We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!

The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!
... See MoreSee Less

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but  the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.  USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.  USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?  · We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA  · We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.  · We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!  The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.Due to market and supply/demand changes for meat products during the #COVID19 pandemic, the MDA is helping #livestock farmers and processors in addressing these current challenges.

More: www.mda.state.mn.us/mda-assists-livestock-producersprocessors-during-covid-19-pandemic #MNAg
... See MoreSee Less

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.

This is the only kind of dirty your hands should be!

We know microbial communities are influenced by management, but to what degree and how do the services they provide differ with management?

A study starting the Summer 2020 will focus on biological function in agricultural systems in North Dakota. In the past, NDSU has worked hard to build information on the chemical properties of soils (fertility, salts, organic matter), physical properties (aggregation, soil texture, water movement) and have been making headway on biological communities, but there's still questions about how soil microbial community function across multiple agricultural systems – a state-wide study. This is part of the Agribiome Research Initiative at NDSU and led by NDSU research faculty, Samiran (Sam) Banerjee.

More organic farms in the region are needed! NPSAS is working with NDSU to secure farmers for the study as we recognize this is a great opportunity for participating farmers to learn more about the soil health on their farm.

Specifics of your field will be kept confidential and you will receive information (e.g., soil health and microbial diversity) specific to your fields at the end of the study. If you are interested in participating, contact Sam (samiran.banerjee@ndsu.edu) or his Research Specialist, Kim Zitnick Anderson (kimberly.zitnick@ndsu.edu; cell: 240 298 2164).
... See MoreSee Less

This is the only kind of dirty your hands should be!  We know microbial communities are influenced by management, but to what degree and how do the services they provide differ with management?  A study starting the Summer 2020 will focus on biological function in agricultural systems in North Dakota. In the past, NDSU has worked hard to build information on the chemical properties of soils (fertility, salts, organic matter), physical properties (aggregation, soil texture, water movement) and have been making headway on biological communities, but theres still questions about how soil microbial community function across multiple agricultural systems – a state-wide study. This is part of the Agribiome Research Initiative at NDSU and led by NDSU research faculty, Samiran (Sam) Banerjee.  More organic farms in the region are needed! NPSAS is working with NDSU to secure farmers for the study as we recognize this is a great opportunity for participating farmers to learn more about the soil health on their farm.  Specifics of your field will be kept confidential and you will receive information (e.g., soil health and microbial diversity) specific to your fields at the end of the study. If you are interested in participating, contact Sam (samiran.banerjee@ndsu.edu) or his Research Specialist, Kim Zitnick Anderson (kimberly.zitnick@ndsu.edu; cell: 240 298 2164).
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NPSAS works directly with farmers to encourage better care of the land by increasing perennial crops, reducing chemical use and developing environmentally beneficial livestock systems.

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NPSAS works directly with farmers to encourage better care of the land by increasing perennial crops, reducing chemical use and developing environmentally beneficial livestock systems.

Learn more