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Way to go, former NPSAS board member, Annie!This week we are going to take a moment and Celebrate some of the inspiring women entrepreneurs that call North Dakota home.

First up, Annie Carlson of Morning Joy Farm and Kitchen. Check out what she had to say.

Who are you and what is your business?
Annie Carlson, Morning Joy Farm & Kitchen - We are a grass-based multi-species farm, focusing on diversity on the landscape. I also own and operate a catering business from our commercial kitchen located on the farm. I am also a writer, speaker, and podcaster.

How did you get started and why?
We started our farm business because both my husband, John, and I came from farm families and knew we didn't want to farm conventionally. We became involved in local food, grass-based farming, and the magic of perennial polycultures.

What are some unexpected or unintended consequences of being an entrepreneur?
I have learned a lot of new skills that I hadn't learned in college at NDSU!!

What are your future plans or where do you see yourself or business in 2 years?
Our farm is a fluid system. We are not locked in to any one marketing or production model. We have been phasing out direct meat sales as more and more producers have started to finish and market their own meat locally. In two years? Probably more sheep, more cows, less poultry....but who knows? We're flexible!

What advice would you give other women thinking about starting their own business?
Be courageous. Be nimble. Be thick-skinned.

Was there a NDSU Extension resource that helped you?
He is retired now, but Glenn Muske was (and still is!) a great resource and friend of our farm. I was a member of Class V of the Rural Leadership North Dakota program and Marie Hvidsten's direction brought a lot of opportunities, networks, and people into our world.

Annie will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming 8 state Extension virtual Connecting Entrepreneurial Communities conference

Register here sites.google.com/umn.edu/cecmultistateshowcase/registration?authuser=0

#NorthDakota #womenentrepreneurs #NDSUExt #WEW2020 #SheStartsWeek
... See MoreSee Less

Way to go, former NPSAS board member, Annie!

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you don't want to miss this farm tour! Hope you can make it.MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you dont want to miss this farm tour!  Hope you can make it.

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.

USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.

USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?

· We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA

· We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.

· We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!

The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!
... See MoreSee Less

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but  the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.  USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.  USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?  · We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA  · We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.  · We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!  The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.Due to market and supply/demand changes for meat products during the #COVID19 pandemic, the MDA is helping #livestock farmers and processors in addressing these current challenges.

More: www.mda.state.mn.us/mda-assists-livestock-producersprocessors-during-covid-19-pandemic #MNAg
... See MoreSee Less

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.
Load more
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Way to go, former NPSAS board member, Annie!This week we are going to take a moment and Celebrate some of the inspiring women entrepreneurs that call North Dakota home.

First up, Annie Carlson of Morning Joy Farm and Kitchen. Check out what she had to say.

Who are you and what is your business?
Annie Carlson, Morning Joy Farm & Kitchen - We are a grass-based multi-species farm, focusing on diversity on the landscape. I also own and operate a catering business from our commercial kitchen located on the farm. I am also a writer, speaker, and podcaster.

How did you get started and why?
We started our farm business because both my husband, John, and I came from farm families and knew we didn't want to farm conventionally. We became involved in local food, grass-based farming, and the magic of perennial polycultures.

What are some unexpected or unintended consequences of being an entrepreneur?
I have learned a lot of new skills that I hadn't learned in college at NDSU!!

What are your future plans or where do you see yourself or business in 2 years?
Our farm is a fluid system. We are not locked in to any one marketing or production model. We have been phasing out direct meat sales as more and more producers have started to finish and market their own meat locally. In two years? Probably more sheep, more cows, less poultry....but who knows? We're flexible!

What advice would you give other women thinking about starting their own business?
Be courageous. Be nimble. Be thick-skinned.

Was there a NDSU Extension resource that helped you?
He is retired now, but Glenn Muske was (and still is!) a great resource and friend of our farm. I was a member of Class V of the Rural Leadership North Dakota program and Marie Hvidsten's direction brought a lot of opportunities, networks, and people into our world.

Annie will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming 8 state Extension virtual Connecting Entrepreneurial Communities conference

Register here sites.google.com/umn.edu/cecmultistateshowcase/registration?authuser=0

#NorthDakota #womenentrepreneurs #NDSUExt #WEW2020 #SheStartsWeek
... See MoreSee Less

Way to go, former NPSAS board member, Annie!

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you don't want to miss this farm tour! Hope you can make it.MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

If you want to see a beautifully managed organic farm, you dont want to miss this farm tour!  Hope you can make it.

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!MOSES board member Charlie Johnson, the 2013 Organic Farmer of the Year, is opening up his farm for his annual tour for a limited group. Want to take part? Contact info is on this flyer. ... See MoreSee Less

Long time NPSAS member and former board member Charlie Johnson is having his annual farm tour. RSVP to get a spot!

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.

USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.

USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?

· We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA

· We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.

· We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!

The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!
... See MoreSee Less

As farmers and ranchers across the country are feeling the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, USDA is preparing to distribute $16 billion in direct aid to producers who have experienced financial losses. Applications for the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program will be open in early May - but  the USDA’s plan isn’t set up to account for farmers who sell into local/regional markets, diversified farmers, or organic farmers, it doesn’t have a thorough outreach plan or reserved funding for underserved producers, it doesn’t reflect realistic timelines for farmers’ losses or their increased expenses in addition to their losses, and it isn’t set up to focus aid on independent, family-scale producers who need help (instead of large corporate operations). Farmers are in need of help now more than ever.  USDA has not yet released full details on their program - so now is the time to ask questions and speak up to ensure the program works for all farmers in need of aid.  USDA has the power to ensure these farmers have support through this unprecedented situation. Now is the time for us to demand better from USDA. How can you help?  · We can share stories that show who is missing from the program and at risk of being left out. If you’re a farmer: share your story on social media, tagging USDA and using the hashtag #dobetterUSDA  · We can ask questions to highlight issues, concerns, and gaps in information about the program. If you’re a farmer: call your county FSA office to ask key questions about the program and who it serves.  · We can demand that USDA do better for farmers and ranchers and share solutions. Not a farmer? Post on social media to stand with farmers and amplify their voices!  The most effective thing you can do is share your own story in your own voice - with photos. Most importantly – speak up about the impacts you are seeing, the market losses you are experiencing, the innovating you are doing, and why it’s important that USDA supports farmers like you. You don’t need to have all the answers – just be willing to speak up in your own words!

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.Due to market and supply/demand changes for meat products during the #COVID19 pandemic, the MDA is helping #livestock farmers and processors in addressing these current challenges.

More: www.mda.state.mn.us/mda-assists-livestock-producersprocessors-during-covid-19-pandemic #MNAg
... See MoreSee Less

MDA offers some help for livestock producers facing disruptions due to Covid.
Load more

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NPSAS works directly with farmers to encourage better care of the land by increasing perennial crops, reducing chemical use and developing environmentally beneficial livestock systems.

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NPSAS works directly with farmers to encourage better care of the land by increasing perennial crops, reducing chemical use and developing environmentally beneficial livestock systems.

Learn more